Tuesday, August 9, 2011

Composers Beware: Some Agents and Conductors don't like unsolicited scores

Conductors are generally extremely busy and have little time to deal with reviewing scores - let alone deal with composers they have no prior knowledge.

I recently received an email from an agent who, after contacting the conductor to whom they represent, told me the conductor never asked for the scores. So, since an orchestra score is bulky, they were not going to forward them on or return them. Note: I hadn't included a self-addressed stamped envelope because most conductors don't return the scores even if they're not interested - so why waste the postage and envelope cost.

Lesson learned: If I haven't actually spoken with the artist or agent, don't send a score.

Prior to sending the scores I had conversed with someone whom I thought had permission to speak for the conductor --one of the orchestras she conducts. This unknown orchestra person was the one who gave me the contact details for the conductor's artist management. Trying to act on good faith, I emailed the agent, but never received a response.

Since I'm moving, I took the chance, packaged up the score and mailed it.

Today, I received the email reply.

To be fair to the agent, they could have just dumped the scores and never said anything. At least they were nice enough to provide a reply (kudos agent!).

I am not trying to indict either the conductor or the agent. This is just my warning to other composers out there, if you haven't specifically connected with the artist/conductor you're wanting to consider your music - be wary about sending music unsolicited.


Suggestion for you:

Utilize Facebook, Linked In, Twitter, Myspace... and other forms of social media to connect.
Once you get a solid connection --you actually are speaking to the artist and not some representative (sometimes this is difficult to tell -- THEN you can ask to send your scores.

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