Mark O'Connor Annouces "Illuminating" 2010 String Camps in New York City and Tennessee

O'Connor Violin Method Gaining Traction Among Teachers, Students

Mark O'Connor, the multi-Grammy-Award-winning composer and violinist, has announced the opening of registration for his 2010 String Camps in New York City and Tennessee. O'Connor has gathered the world's top violinists, violists and cellists to give intermediate, advanced and professional string players an extraordinary week of instruction and performance at each camp.

The camps will also offer teacher training courses in the new O'Connor Violin Method, which has been widely praised since its debut in fall 2009 as "an American grown rival to the Suzuki method" (The New Yorker). It was inspired by his students and by his belief that those who learn to play the "rich stream of American music" (as the Wall Street Journal recently described the O'Connor Method) will enjoy playing music for a lifetime. Teachers who have been trained in the Method have been wildly enthusiastic, calling it "inspiring" and "an incredible opportunity to enrich and engage future generations."

The second annual New York City camp will run July 26-30, 2010 at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School and the Society for Ethical Culture. More than 200 students at the inaugural camp in 2009 experienced an inspiring week of instruction in a multitude of string playing styles from O'Connor and from some of the world's finest performers and teachers in jazz, classical, folk fiddling and world music.

O'Connor's first Fiddle Camp was held in Tennessee in 1994. This year, the camp will take place June 21 - 25, at the campus of the East Tennessee State University (ETSU) in Johnson City, TN. To register and for more details and a list of instructors, visit MarkOConnor.com.

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