Opera Colorado Presents Offenbach's Vivid Fantasy The Tales of Hoffmann

4 Performances Only: November 7, 10, 13 & 15

DENVER, CO— A poet explores a surreal dreamscape as he recalls his lost loves in Opera Colorado’s production of Offenbach's The Tales of Hoffmann, playing for four performances only at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, November 7 through the 15. Tickets, ranging in price from $30 to $160 are available at OperaColorado.org or by calling 800.982.ARTS.

Created by director Renaud Doucet and production designer André Barbe, the opera is a vivid flight of the imagination about a poet named Hoffmann who is in love with four unforgettable women. The hero travels to a mad scientist’s laboratory, the surreal home of a fragile young singer, and a Venetian brothel, but encounters evil villains who seek to ruin his chance at love. Offenbach’s lush music fuels the visual style of the stage design, inspired by graphic artist M.C. Escher, and the lavish costumes, inspired by 19th century French couture. This will be Opera Colorado’s first performance of Offenbach’s masterpiece in more than twenty-five years.

The opera stars Australian tenor Julian Gavin (Carmen, 2005) in the title role alongside soprano Pamela Armstrong (La traviata, 2007), who takes on the challenging task of performing all four female roles. Normally these roles are performed by three different singers; to take on all four roles is truly a superhuman feat for any soprano. French-Canadian bass-baritone Gaétan Laperrière makes his Opera Colorado debut performing the roles of the Four Villains. The performance will be conducted by renowned French conductor Emmanuel Joel-Hornak, making his Opera Colorado debut.

The Tales of Hoffmann was created by Opera Colorado in cooperation with Opera Theatre of St. Louis and Boston Lyric Opera.

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